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June 16, 2014

Canada’s federal competition law regulator, the Competition Bureau (the “Bureau”), continues (at least as far as I can tell) to increase its “transparency” efforts posting more materials than perhaps was the case in the past. Earlier today, the Bureau announced two new publications – a Canadian competition law video (see: here) and its contribution to a new OECD Roundtable on competition and airlines (see: Competition Bureau Submission on OECD Roundtable on Airlines).

The Bureau’s new video provides a “high level” view of competition and the Bureau’s work, including some of the benefits of competition (e.g., lower prices, more choice, innovation, etc.), the Bureau’s enforcement mandate and some of its key priorities (e.g., advocacy, promotion of competition law compliance, collaboration and communication with stakeholders).  This new Bureau video is apparently an effort by the Bureau to decode and explain to Canadian consumers and businesses what it does.

The Bureau’s new OECD submission includes: a brief history of the Canadian airline industry, including a high-level overview of key industry changes and the evolution of Canada’s regulatory and legislative environment since the 1980s; information about the Bureau’s major airline related enforcement cases since 2001; and details about the Bureau’s approach in examining alleged airline related anti-competitive conduct since 2001.

The OECD’s Roundtable and other competition law reports tend to be excellent current summaries of what leading competition law agencies’ positions around the world are on key competition law enforcement and policy topics.

In this respect, for a few other recent OECD competition law related publications with Canadian contributions see: Fighting Corruption and Promoting Competition, Competition in Road Fuel, Promoting Compliance with Competition Law, Remedies in Merger Cases, Economic Evidence in Merger Analysis and Competition Issues in the Distribution of Pharmaceuticals.

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